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Learn and Explore

Since 1916, the National Park Service has been entrusted with the care of our national parks. With the help of volunteers and partners, we safeguard these special places and share their stories with more than 275 million visitors every year. But our work doesn’t stop there.

We are proud that tribes, local governments, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and individual citizens ask for our help in revitalizing their communities, preserving local history, celebrating local heritage, and creating close to home opportunities for kids and families to get outside, be active, and have fun.

Taking care of the national parks and helping Americans take care of their communities is a job we love, and we need—and welcome—your help and support.

Our Mission

The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I obtain a park entrance pass?

Only 118 of your 417 park sites charge entrance fees. You can obtain park entrance passes by visiting a park site that charges an entrance fee. Entrance fee sites have passes available; we recommend calling a park prior to your visit. (See the park search to locate a specific park.) There are a number of entrance passes available, including park-specific passes as well as passes that offer entrance to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites in addition to the national parks (Annual, Military, Senior, 4th Grade, Access, and Volunteer passes). Learn more about the America the Beautiful – The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass.

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About this location:

National Wild and Scenic River

Operating Hours & Seasons

Lower Delaware National Wild and Scenic River

The largest free-flowing river in the eastern United States, the Delaware River runs past forests, farmlands, and villages, and it also links some of the most densely populated regions in America. In 2000, the National Wild and Scenic River System incorporated key segments of the lower Delaware River to form this unit of the National Park System.

Standard Hours

  • Sunday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Monday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Tuesday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Wednesday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Thursday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Friday: Sunrise – Sunset
  • Saturday: Sunrise – Sunset

Fees & Passes

    Entrance Fees:

    • $0.00 – Entrance Fees
      There are no fees associated with the Lower Delaware National Wild & Scenic River. However, there are private organizations operating near the river that may charge for their services.

    About

    A River and its History

    The largest free-flowing river in the eastern United States, the Delaware River runs past forests, farmlands, and villages, and it also links some of the most densely populated regions in America.

    In 2000, the National Wild and Scenic River System incorporated key segments of the lower Delaware River to form this unit of the National Park System.

    Directions

    The Lower Delaware National Wild and Scenic River is located between Interstate 80 (at Portland, Pennsylvania and Columbia, New Jersey) and Interstate 95 (at exit 51 in Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania and exit 1 in Washington Crossing, New Jersey). In Pennsylvania, follow PA-611 and PA-32 to drive along the river. In New Jersey, follow NJ-29 south of Frenchtown for a drive along the river.

    Visitor Centers

    No Visitor Center

    There are no visitor centers associated with Lower Delaware National Wild and Scenic River.

    Weather

    Spring: Temperatures usually range from lows of 26 F to highs of 80 F with average rainfall of 5 inches. Summer: Temperatures usually range from lows of 55 F to highs of 85 F with average rainfall of 4 inches. Fall: Temperatures usually range from lows of 30 F to highs of 83F. Fall foliage is at its peak sometime in October as daily mountain temperatures vary frequently and influence the change. Winter: Temperatures usually range from lows of 15 F to highs of 49 F.



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