Ahupua a O Kahana State Park — Ahupua A O Kahana State Park
Oahu, HI
Hours and Location

Category: State Parks

State Parks

Click to see nearby in Oahu.

Ahupua a O Kahana State Park is currently Open.

Ahupua a O Kahana State Park Hours

Mon -   -
Tue -   -
Wed -   -
Thu -   -
Fri -   -
Sat -   -
Sun -   -
 

What is your favorite purchase at Hawaii Division of State Parks?

(*) Required

More nearby:
PattyT
Wed, Mar 14 at 07:40pm

This is what I get for a last minute small party: ribs from the prepared food section, cocktail shrimps, potato salad, caesar salad, and their incredibly yummy strawberry cheesecake. A hit every time more…and no work at all.
SallyN
Wed, Mar 14 at 07:38pm

Picked up Suger Bowl Bakery Duet Bites yesterday for a potluck. They are half brownie and half madeleine and a perfect blend of sweet. All gone in 10 minutes
Jennifer
Thu, Apr 26 at 12:07pm

Home decor and furnishings
Kellylyn Kanski
Sat, May 5 at 04:17pm

I like the service that I received at the Sonora store. Petra was great help
barbara Lehmann
Mon, May 14 at 04:20pm

the Texas Pecon flavored coffee
Cindy Bain
Sun, May 6 at 05:46pm

40% off, especially when I need rotary blades
Scott Haun
Sat, Apr 28 at 11:30pm

Avenger infinity war
Darbie Davidson
Mon, Apr 30 at 02:41pm

The Outshine Fruit Bars and the German Bratwurst
sue millet
Mon, Apr 30 at 03:02am

package of frozen ribeye shaved meat
Joan horn
Sat, May 12 at 04:26pm

Bagels cannolis

State Park

Hours

Daily During Daylight Hours

Beach Area:

April 1 to Labor Day:

7 am to 7:45 pm

After Labor Day to March 31:

7 am to 6:45 pm

Coconut grove area:

Open Daily 7 am to 6:45 pm

Entrance Fee

  • None

About

Ahupuaʻa ʻO Kahana State Park is located on the windward side of O’ahu, between Kane’ohe and Laʻie, and 26 miles from Honolulu. Kahana is a relatively unspoiled valley, and one of only a few publicly owned ahupuaʻa, or ancient Hawaiian land division, in the state.

An ahupuaʻa includes lands from the mountains to the sea (mauka-makai), encompassing all of the resource zones needed for subsistence. The ahupuaʻa of Kahana encompasses almost 5,300 acres, ranging from sea level at Kahana Bay to 2,670 feet at Puʻu Pauao on the crest of the Koʻolau mountains. Kahana is one of the wettest valleys on Oʻahu. Overcast skies and showers are frequent, with an average annual rainfall of 75″ along the coast to 300″ at the back of the valley. Temperatures can range from the mid-60s to the mid-80s.

Cultural Background

Kahana was a thriving fishing and farming community prior to Western contact. Those living in Kahana had an abundance of fresh water and fertile soil on the valley floor to cultivate kalo (taro), the staple crop. The loʻi (ponded fields of kalo) were irrigated by ʻauwai (ditches) that diverted water from the streams to the fields. Kahana Bay provided a wealth of fish and shellfish.

In the 19th Century, following the unification of the Hawaiian Islands by Kamehameha I, the population rapidly declined as a result of Western contact and the introduction of foreign diseases. Sugar cane cultivation and the use of the valley as a WWII jungle warfare training site, have altered the natural and cultural environment of Kahana.

The Living Park

The primary purpose of this park is to nurture and foster native Hawaiian cultural traditions and the cultural landscape of rural windward Oʻahu. Established as a “living park”, there are thirty-one families living in the ahupuaʻa of Kahana. These families assist with interpretive programs that share the Hawaiian values and lifestyle. If you have a group interested in a cultural program at the park, please call 237-7767.

Archaeology

There are extensive remnants of Hawaiian culture in the valley, including a heiau (religious temple), koʻa (fishing shrines), fishponds, house sites, stone-walled enclosures, ʻauwai (irrigation channels), agricultural terraces, walls and planting areas. While many of these sites are inaccessible to the public, Kapa’ele’ele Koʻa and Keaniani Kilo (lookout) are accessible via a trail on the west side of the valley mouth. From the kilo, the kilo iʻa, or fish watcher, spied schools of akule in the bay and signaled to valley residents who would collectively net them. Huilua Fishpond, the most impressive site in the valley, and presently under restoration, can be visited from the east side of the bay.

Trails

There are two hiking trails available to the public. Both are relatively easy walking, but trails may be muddy. No permits are required and detailed trail maps are available at the Orientation Center.

Kapa’ele’ele Ko’a and Keaniani Lookout Trail is a one mile long loop trail that begins at the Orientation Center and takes about one hour. The trail passes two cultural sites and offers stunning views of Kahana Bay.

Nakoa Trail is named for the koa trees found along this 2.5 mile loop trail through a tropical rain forest. The loop hike takes about 2 hours. The total length of the hike is 5 miles from the Orientation Center. The trailhead can be reached by following the main road up the valley. This trail crosses Kahana Stream twice. Fruit picking when in season.

Activities

  • Beachgoing
  • Camping
  • Dogs on Leash
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Hunting
  • Sightseeing

Facilities

  • Boat Ramp
  • Campsites
  • Picnic table
  • Restroom
  • Showers
  • Trash Cans
  • Water Fountain

Camping

There are ten (10) beach campsites in the park. Camping is by permit only.
Fees start at $12 per campsite per night.

Prohibited

  • No Motorized Vehicles/ATV's
  • No Alcoholic Beverages
  • No Open Fires
  • No Smoking
  • No Commercial Activities

 

 
Dot is Green if Ahupua a O Kahana State Park is currently open and Red if currently closed.
  As of: 11:04 am (HST)   Tue May 22, 2018. [Change]